Plantar Fasciitis

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Hi all,

 

I have been diagnosed with Plantar Fasciitis recently--caused by wearing Crocs all the time while I was pregnant. Anyway, my Dr. gave me a shot, a nite splint, and heel cups. While my pain is better, I really think some type of orthotic would really help. Dr. is balking at Rx orthotics--not sure why except he said OTC seem to work better. I see him again next Tuesday. I tried Dr. Scholls inserts for PF, but they actually hurt worse. I visited Good Feet, and was shocked at the $550 price tag. Road Runner Sports sells custom insoles for about $60. But at this point, my insurance would cover Rx orthotics 100% since I just had a baby. I'm just looking for ideas and references for specific products so I can go to my Dr. informed on what I need.

 

Thank you!

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I had custom orthodics made up a few week ago for $200. Feel great, but I am by no means healed up. Was the shot cortisone? Did it help?
Congratulations for your baby!

I'd definetely recommend the prescribed type. Even within the prescription ones, there are qualities. Make sure to get your's at a podiatrist (DPM). A good insert is rigid, folds only under the ball of foot and toes, and is molded on your feet after a biomechanical exam. My podiatrist uses special cusionning to ease the PF while it heals. It makes the insert thicker but it's really worth the confort. And he can remove it once the PF is gone without re-molding everything and paying for another pair (unless remolding is necessary, of course).

In the long run, custom inserts can correct some biomechanical issues that could end up causing PF (duh) knee, and back pain. Well worth it.

There is no cure-all though. Keep using the night splint, learn the good stretches with a physio, ice several times a day. Inserts may or may not work alone to cure PF, but they are a healthy addition in the long run.
Hi
I have plantar fasciitis myself for a few months now. My podiatrist prescribed me with custom-made orthotics which did not work at all. There are many treatment techniques that you can try. There are Taping techniques that I find very useful.
There is good information about plantar fasciitis inserts in this web page:
http://www.plantar-fasciitis-elrofeet.com/Plantar_Fasciitis_Inserts...
Take care & Good luck
You need find another Dr. I have worn custom orthotics for 2 years and have gone from a shot every 2 months to a shot every 2 years. And also tried over the counter and they were crap!
Best Regards,
Melanie, I've had PF for almost two year now. I tried Rx orthotics; they not only didn't work, I think they may have actually made my pain worse. I ended up firing my first doctor and found another. This second doctor told me NOT to wear my Rx orthotics and instead recommended an OTC insole called Sole Dean. He also recommended a type of shoe that, on the surface looks like a regular tennis shoe, but that has a stiff, metal band in the sole, and cannot be bent like other stiff sole shoes. The only name I can see on the shoe is Versa Lite. Not sure if that's the name brand or style. I'll see if I can find out more infor and post it at a later date.

Anyway, the combination of these shoes, the Sole Dean insoles, and the mild excersises this new doctor has recommended has just about cured my PF. It's been about 5 months since I began wearing the insoles (every day) and I can walk, hike (albiet not for more than an hour or two), and do all the normal daily activities I use to do. Prior to wearing these insoles I couldn't walk from my truck to my office (about 300 yards) without having to sit down due to the pain.

I still have some pain, and after too much time on my feet I'm reminded that I still have PF, but its nothing like before I began wearing these insoles. I recommend you try these Sole Dean insoles before trying the Rx orthotics, and wear them with the stiffest shoe you can find. And if you do this, please post what you think so that others can see if this works or doesn't work for you. Good luck!
FYI, shoes should be sturdy and stable to limit lateral torsions, BUT it's essential that they bend at the ball of foot (unless your Md prescribed you a rocker sole, which takes care of that motion while limiting dorsiflexion). Otherwise, you're in for trouble.

New Balance has the #845 and 846 models which are a staple for feet sufferers and include a motion control design. Some of their trainers feature a stability web, but a Rx insert acts just the same as that piece of rigid plastic.

David, have you wondered that perhaps your stretches might have made the difference? I believe they are a very crucial part of a good rehab plan. Good to read you can now hike. It keeps us all hopeful!

David Miller Jr. said:
and wear them with the stiffest shoe you can find. >
Honestly, I believe its the insoles that has made all the difference. I can fit them into other shoes such as my Cabelas hiking boots, my chest wader boots, and my boat slippers. The only thing I've done consistantly for the last 5 months is wear these insoles. There have been days where I've skipped or "cheated" on the excersises, and I haven't always worn my night splint either.

But you know, as with all of us, no one thing is the "magical" cure. Its more than likely a combination of many things that ultimately relieves the pain and makes it possible to move around normally. All I know for sure is that I will continue to wear these insoles. I also think I'm going to try the New Balances that you mentioned as I'm in need a new pair of tennis shoes again.

Mary said:
FYI, shoes should be sturdy and stable to limit lateral torsions, BUT it's essential that they bend at the ball of foot (unless your Md prescribed you a rocker sole, which takes care of that motion while limiting dorsiflexion). Otherwise, you're in for trouble.

New Balance has the #845 and 846 models which are a staple for feet sufferers and include a motion control design. Some of their trainers feature a stability web, but a Rx insert acts just the same as that piece of rigid plastic.

David, have you wondered that perhaps your stretches might have made the difference? I believe they are a very crucial part of a good rehab plan. Good to read you can now hike. It keeps us all hopeful!

David Miller Jr. said:
and wear them with the stiffest shoe you can find. >
It's awesome that you've found something that helps! If you go for NB, make sure you pick a model that's designed for your preferred activity. The models #'s I mentionned are for walking and everyday activities.

David Miller Jr. said:
Honestly, I believe its the insoles that has made all the difference. I can fit them into other shoes such as my Cabelas hiking boots, my chest wader boots, and my boat slippers. The only thing I've done consistantly for the last 5 months is wear these insoles. There have been days where I've skipped or "cheated" on the excersises, and I haven't always worn my night splint either.
But you know, as with all of us, no one thing is the "magical" cure. Its more than likely a combination of many things that ultimately relieves the pain and makes it possible to move around normally. All I know for sure is that I will continue to wear these insoles. I also think I'm going to try the New Balances that you mentioned as I'm in need a new pair of tennis shoes again.
Thank you for all the replies! My Dr. absolutely would not order Rx orthotics--I got the impression that he has a *thing* against expensive orthotics that don't work and the podiatrists that make them (I went to an orthopaedic dr.). He recommended the ~$60 Lynco by Aetrex L400 or L600 insoles. I'm considering trying the custom insoles from Road Runner Sports--there's a store close by and they have a 30 day guarantee.

On another note, I just ordered some of the New Balance 846 from Amazon. They have an amazing sale on right now http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/38023?utm_source=feedburner&utm...
Hey, good luck with all of these changes! Hope they do the trick. Not a bad idea to try less expensive insoles first... if they turn out to be working, you'll end up spending less and heal just as well!

Let me know how you like the 846. I've yet to get downtown and compare the fit and support with the (uglier) 845 and perhaps other pairs. :)

Melanie Nygaard said:
Thank you for all the replies! My Dr. absolutely would not order Rx orthotics--I got the impression that he has a *thing* against expensive orthotics that don't work and the podiatrists that make them (I went to an orthopaedic dr.). He recommended the ~$60 Lynco by Aetrex L400 or L600 insoles. I'm considering trying the custom insoles from Road Runner Sports--there's a store close by and they have a 30 day guarantee.

On another note, I just ordered some of the New Balance 846 from Amazon. They have an amazing sale on right now http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/38023?utm_source=feedburner&utm...
Well,
ill offer my insight and hope it helps. I have them all. The custom fit orthotics are hard and uncomfortable. They also didnt help much. I went with super feet and they did offer a bit of comfort. Dr. sholls is a waste. they just dont last long enough. Super feet sell for about $30. The military and police academies recommend them. Also, my doctor refused to do the orthotics until i went through about 6 rounds of cortizone shots. Hope this helps you.

I have just been diagnosed with planters very painful any suggestions for starters

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