Plantar Fasciitis

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Is there any way to qucikly get rid of the inflammation?
It's driving me crazy and I can't wear my arch supports because it's too tight to wear them when my feet are inflamed.

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It would probably depend on what is causing the inflammation and whether what you are feeling in the arches is really due to the plantar fasciitis or not. It may not be. For example, you can get "edema" or general swelling due to poor circulation or not enough muscle activity. That happens to me sometimes and makes any shoes very uncomfortable in the arch area and area of the laces.

I've not heard of inflammation from plantar fasciitis being enough to cause problems with arch supports being uncomfortable, and most people with PF have the inflammation in the heel rather than the arches. But I'm not an expert and there seem to always be exceptions to everything, from what I've read.

If the swelling is due to plantar fasciitis or other injury, I think the usual recommendation is to ice the area. Some people recommend using a can of frozen vegetables (or a frozen cup of water in a styrofoam cup) and rolling your foot over it.

If the swelling is due to poor circulation or sitting too long then exercises that keep your feet and ankle more active while you are sitting (as well as making sure to get up once in a while and walk around) can help.

Good luck.
Thank you for your answer, altough the inflammation is not in the arch itself it's in the ball of the feet and the sides.
Anyway I somehow managed to get most of it away, I don't really know how but I guess it's because I used alot of ice yesterday, so it's mostly ok now.
Serious inflammation is very rare with PF. The fact that your feet & arches are inflamed tells me a thing or 2 about why you have PF. Edema happens when lymph and other fluids can't move back up the leg. The usual cause is "poor circulation", which is true, but it's only part of the story. You see, there is a type of tissue called fascia that surrounds each muscle. It's supposed to act like a semi-permeable gel membrane, allowing the muscles to glide over each other. When a muscle doesn't get to move properly for long enough it starts acting like sprayed on styrofoam instead. It binds layers of muscle & tendon together like spaghetti that someone threw into a pot and didn't stir. These are called adhesions. They can also interfere with lymphatic fluid flow, and if they get bad enough they can entrap nerves and blood vessels too. The only way that the lymph is pumped is by muscle action. The 2 big muscles in the calf, gastrocnemius & soleus are what pumps blood and fluid from the foot, up into the leg & trunk. Of course with PF, exercising is brutal, but those calves really need to pump, so the next best thing is rocking in a rocking chair. It's no load exercise for the calves, and helps get everything back up where it belongs. Next, you need to make sure you take out all the adhesions from your ankles & feet, and all the way up to your knees. Most of this you can do yourself. As for inflammation... ice is your friend. So is bio-freeze. You may also want to consider a looser pair of shoes, and make sure you take out the insoles that are already there before you add new ones.
What do you mean....you can do most of the taking out of adhesions yourself?

Kay Warren said:
Serious inflammation is very rare with PF. The fact that your feet & arches are inflamed tells me a thing or 2 about why you have PF. Edema happens when lymph and other fluids can't move back up the leg. The usual cause is "poor circulation", which is true, but it's only part of the story. You see, there is a type of tissue called fascia that surrounds each muscle. It's supposed to act like a semi-permeable gel membrane, allowing the muscles to glide over each other. When a muscle doesn't get to move properly for long enough it starts acting like sprayed on styrofoam instead. It binds layers of muscle & tendon together like spaghetti that someone threw into a pot and didn't stir. These are called adhesions. They can also interfere with lymphatic fluid flow, and if they get bad enough they can entrap nerves and blood vessels too. The only way that the lymph is pumped is by muscle action. The 2 big muscles in the calf, gastrocnemius & soleus are what pumps blood and fluid from the foot, up into the leg & trunk. Of course with PF, exercising is brutal, but those calves really need to pump, so the next best thing is rocking in a rocking chair. It's no load exercise for the calves, and helps get everything back up where it belongs. Next, you need to make sure you take out all the adhesions from your ankles & feet, and all the way up to your knees. Most of this you can do yourself. As for inflammation... ice is your friend. So is bio-freeze. You may also want to consider a looser pair of shoes, and make sure you take out the insoles that are already there before you add new ones.
ice packs..ice packs ..ice packs..they are great for the pain & inflammation

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